reblogged from kitsiinabox

dailymantra:

Don’t let the pressure of school work get to you because look what happened to Shou Tucker when he rushed to get a project done

reblogged from feelmetal-alchemist
tastefullyoffensive:

The best costume spotted at Disneyland’s 10k race today. [adamlc6]

tastefullyoffensive:

The best costume spotted at Disneyland’s 10k race today. [adamlc6]

reblogged from off-in-lala-land
  • computer: whhhhhhhhHHHHHRHRRRRRRRRRRR
  • me: shh it's ok
reblogged from freakypencils

punnier:

how do french cats talk to eachother?

they chat

reblogged from freakypencils
source: punnier 39,891 notes 9.1.2014 12:03 AM

if the homunculi were on tumblr

  • gluttony: food pictures and text posts, doesn't go on a whole lot and does a lot of reblogs
  • envy: wellknown blogger who posts myspace style pictures of his dyed hair and makes a big show of how he says whatever he wants, he won't tag anything for followers because "you can't censor me"
  • pride: posts creepy urban legends and always types with proper grammar and spelling, doesn't follow many people
  • greed: SWAG BLOGGER SUMMER 2012 LIVES FOREVER YOLO
  • lust: fashion blogger, doesn't do a lot of arguing but is very well worded, rather serious
  • sloth: that person who has that really good url you want but has like one post and hasn't been on in 3 years
  • wrath: works for the site, wants everyone to use terms and conditions
reblogged from feelmetal-alchemist
futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective
Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…
…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.
Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective

Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…

…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.

Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

reblogged from mapsontheweb
mapsontheweb:

Fewer than 1% of Canadians live in the white area

mapsontheweb:

Fewer than 1% of Canadians live in the white area

reblogged from mapsontheweb

lintott:

i always think “if people want to talk to me they will” which is my reasoning for never really starting conversations so i’m permanently thinking no one wants to talk but what if they’re sat there thinking the same and it’s just this cycle of silence that never gets broken because i’m too stubborn to just put myself out there 

reblogged from off-in-lala-land
source: lintott 351,648 notes 8.30.2014 4:36 PM
concretefemme:

look at this cop-hating suffragette kitty 

concretefemme:

look at this cop-hating suffragette kitty 

reblogged from notedyounghistorian

arthnoldpendragon:

steven moffat is the writer of some of doctor who’s scariest monsters, for example the weeping angels, atrocious writing and misogyny

reblogged from off-in-lala-land

cruelkid:

stop-hammerkind:

alittlebitofshipping:

novakian:

ohai-mg:

cuddleing:

i lost it with the salad

completely lost it at the gravy

are you srs i couldn’t make it past the brussels sprouts

All I could even say is wtf is wrong with Billy, my god.

"Billy needs therapy"

I literally started crying

reblogged from colclplay
  • Me: Oh boy my writing made people cry! Yes cry more, rage at me, tell me how much pain my story caused you!
  • Also me: [lying awake at night worrying I accidentally hurt someone's feelings over a year ago]
cookiecreation:

Colonel needs to dry before he can become useful again.

cookiecreation:

Colonel needs to dry before he can become useful again.

reblogged from feelmetal-alchemist
mbrainspaz:

"I wish I was a better man." And there, ladies, gents, and whoever else, we have what I love so much about Moist Von Lipwig. He’s a scoundrel and a crook, but instead of learning to be the ‘good man’ he isn’t, he becomes a scoundrel for the forces of good. A better man.

mbrainspaz:

"I wish I was a better man." 

And there, ladies, gents, and whoever else, we have what I love so much about Moist Von Lipwig. He’s a scoundrel and a crook, but instead of learning to be the ‘good man’ he isn’t, he becomes a scoundrel for the forces of good. A better man.

reblogged from mbrainspaz